Question Type

Lumi ViewPoint questions make a Microsoft Office PowerPoint slide show interactive
by allowing an audience to vote in real time using either IML Click or IML Connector
handsets. As soon as the votes are closed then the results appear instantly in a variety of display types. Interactive questions are created using the Lumi ViewPoint software onto regular PowerPoint slides.

There are three types of interactive questions:

  • Mulitple Choice
  • Numeric Range
  • Text - IML Connector and Lumi ViewPoint Pro only


Multiple Choice

A numbered list of choices is created below the question. The audience press the
corresponding number key(s) on their IML Click or IML Connector handset to vote for their preferred choice(s). If a vote is received that does not match the number of a choice within the list then it is counted as invalid.

Multiple choice questions therefore are highly effective for asking 'closed' questions,
whereby the audience can only vote for one or more of the possible answers that you are interested in.

Displays

There are five available display types for multiple choice questions:
  • Bar chart
  • Pie chart
  • Table

    The following display types are only available if multiples election is enabled and show how the audience prioritised each choice:
  • Breakdown Bars
  • Breakdown Table 

Multiple Choice Variants

There are three types of multiple choice question:

Type Description
Single Choice The audience can vote for one choice from the list.
Multiple Selection

The audience can vote for more than one choice. The number of choices that the audience can vote for is set by the 'Maximum allowed selections' field within the 'Question Editor'. The audience can vote for less choices if they wish.
Multiple selection is useful when you want the audience to freely vote for as many choices as they wish from a list, but their choices are of equal importance.

For example "What methods of transport make up your daily commute?".

Multiple selection can also be used for quiz questions where there could be more than one correct answer, e.g. "Which of the following cities have never hosted a Summer Olympic Games?".

Ranking

The audience rank a list of choices and the results are weighted so that their highest priority choices have greater importance. The number of 'allowed selections' must be greater than one before 'ranking' can be enabled within the 'Question Editor'.

Unlike unweighted multiple selection questions, the audience must enter their choices in order of priority before pressing the 'Send' key when voting.

Ranking is useful for questions where you are trying to gauge popular opinion and priorities, e.g. "Which kind of holidays do you like?". The choices are 'Cruises', 'City Breaks', 'Winter Activities' and 'Sunbathing'. As in this case, it is often likely that a large proportion of the audience will vote for every choice. If the results are not weighted in order of preference then this can sometimes lead to a very flat result, with little difference between each choice.


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Numeric Range

Allows audience to vote for any number within the valid voting range. The audience press the number key(s) on their IML Click or IML Connector handset to enter their vote. The audience can only enter one vote. If a vote is received that does not match a number within the range then it is counted as invalid.

Numeric range questions can be used for asking 'closed' questions, in the same way as multiple choice, whereby the audience are aware of the range and how they must vote. However numeric range questions can be also be used to gather a more 'open' response by not showing the range to the audience, and setting the lower and upper limits well below and above what would be a sensible answer to the question. The second example question in the table below is an example of an 'open' question. This question could effectively be displayed as calculated values, thus hiding the valid voting range. Once the vote is closed then only the average response could be shown.


Displays

There are three available display types for numeric range questions:

  • Column chart
  • Table
  • Calculated Values


Mulitple Selection Results

Multiple selection votes are multiple choice questions where the audience can vote for more than one choice.

Percentage Calculations

Multiple selection questions can still be displayed as bar charts, pie charts or tables, as with any other multiple choice question. Additionally the results may be displayed as either breakdown bars or as a breakdown table to show the how each choice was prioritised, effectively providing a non-weighted ranking display. There are also two ways of calculating data labels displayed as percentages:

  • Percentage of Voters
  • Percentage of Votes Cast


Percentage of Voters

The results for each choice are calculated as the percentage of responding members of the audience who voted for that choice, out of the total number of respondents.
'Percentage of Voters' is the default method of calculating multiple selection percentages, because presenters often talk about the results in terms of what percentage of the audience voted for each choice.


However, because the audience can vote for more than one choice, the percentages for all choices will often add up to more than 100%. Therefore the presenter needs to know how to interpret the results so that the audience understands.

Percentage of Votes Cast

The results for each choice are calculated as the percentage of votes received for each choice, out of the total number of votes cast for all choices. Unlike 'Percentage of Voters', this option means that the results will always add up to 100%. However it can be less clear how many people actually voted for each choice. In the example below 100% of the audience voted for the third choice. Yet the results could be interpreted that just under a third of the audience chose 'Tennis', when in fact everybody did.

Both calculation methods still show which choices were the most popular, and you can see. The choice of data label type for multiple selection votes should be made by the presenter dependent on how they wish to interpret the results.

Formula

V =  Number of votes received for each choice
P =  Total number of respondents (people who voted)
T =  Total number of votes received for all choices
% = Percentage result for each choice

 

Percentage of Voters

(V/P) x 100 = % 

For example, 3 out of 5 people vote for the second choice (as in figure 7). Therefore V = 3, and P = 5. The results for this choice are calculated as:

  • 3/5 = 0.6
  • 0.6 x 100 = 60%


Percentage of Votes Cast
(V/T) x 100 = %

For example, 3 out of 16 votes are received for the second choice (as in figure 8).
Therefore V = 3, and T = 16. The results for this choice are calculated as:

  • 3/16 = 0.1875
  • 0.1875 x 100 = 18.8% (rounded to 1 decimal place.)


Ranking Results

Ranking votes are multiple choice questions where the audience prioritise a list of choices and the results are weighted so that their preferred choices have greater importance.

Ranking Displays

Ranking questions can still be displayed as bar charts, pie charts or tables, as with any other multiple choice question, which show the overall proportion of weighted responses received for each choice, clearly showing which were the most popular choices. Additionally the results may be displayed as either breakdown bars or as a breakdown table to show the proportion of responses for each choice by choice position, which is more useful when you would like to see if there is any commonality between the audiences' priorities.


Weighting

Weighting means that a person's first choice is equal to one more vote than their second choice, their third choice is equal to one more vote than their 3rd choice, etc. The number of votes that the first choice is worth is always equal to the maximum number of allowed selections.

For example, if the audience were being asked to rank three choices out of a list of nine, then everybody's first choice would be worth 3 votes, their second choice 2 votes and their last choice 1 vote. If someone was to only vote for one choice, then their vote would still be counted as their first choice and therefore equal to 3 votes.

Accompany each ranking result display is a weighting key that shows the audience how many weighted votes (referred to as weighted points) their first and second choices will be worth.

Choice Position


Choice position is most relevant for ranking questions and is the place in a sequence in which a choice is voted for, i.e. 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc. For example if an attendee sends a vote of "624", then their first choice is 6, their second choice is 2 and their third choice is 4. The results per each choice position are visible if you choose either breakdown bars or breakdown table as the display type for a question.


Weighted Points


To avoid confusion, IML ViewPoint Premium refers to weighted votes as 'weighted points'. Otherwise both the presenter and audience may not understand why there seems to be more votes received than they are members of the audience.


Weighted Percentages

The percentages for each choice position are calculated from the number of weighted points received for each choice position (1st, 2nd, etc.) of each choice, divided by the total of all weighted points from all choices across all choice positions.

The total percentages for each choice are then calculated as the sum of all weighted
percentages across all choice positions for each choice. The total for all choices will always add up to 100%.

In practice, weighted percentages may not be as easy to interpret for both presenter and audience as weighted points because they do not show as clearly that the results are weighted. Also the percentages do not relate as clearly to the weighting key shown with all ranking displays.


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Reviewed and Approved by Product Team